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Researchers Say Overconsumption, Not Sugar, Is the Problem

Researchers Say Overconsumption, Not Sugar, Is the Problem

A study found that a little natural fructose could actually improve blood sugar control

Fructose, especially high fructose corn syrup, may have a bad rap in the health food world, but new research suggests that a little bit of natural sugar may not be that bad.

A study from researchers at Toronto's St. Michael's Hospital found that a little bit of fructose may be beneficial for diabetes patients. The study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, examined 209 participants with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Participants were given diets of equal calories, one group with fructose incorporated and one group without.

Diets with a bit of fructose actually improved blood sugar control, the results showed, working as effectively as diabetes drugs. However, researchers suggest it's more about moderation than anything else.

"Attention needs to go back where it belongs, which is on the concept of moderation," Adrian Cozma, the lead author, said in a press release.

In fact, the fructose didn't even increase body weight, blood pressure, or cholesterol, researchers said.

"We're seeing that there may be benefit if fructose wasn't being consumed in such large amounts," Cozma said. "All negative attention on fructose-related harm draws further away from the issue of eating too many calories."

Naturally, more research will be needed to confirm the results, but this gives us an excuse to have that little bit of chocolate today.


Obesity, Sugar and Heart Health

Over the last half century, obesity rates have skyrocketed. In 1962, 46 percent of adults in the U.S. were considered overweight or obese. By 2010, that figure had jumped to 75 percent.

Obesity is a complex problem with multiple causes. But among the likely suspects, sugar is high on the list. As sugar consumption has increased, so too has our national waistline.

If you’re concerned about protecting your health and your heart, you might want to take a closer look at the sweet stuff in your life.


Obesity, Sugar and Heart Health

Over the last half century, obesity rates have skyrocketed. In 1962, 46 percent of adults in the U.S. were considered overweight or obese. By 2010, that figure had jumped to 75 percent.

Obesity is a complex problem with multiple causes. But among the likely suspects, sugar is high on the list. As sugar consumption has increased, so too has our national waistline.

If you’re concerned about protecting your health and your heart, you might want to take a closer look at the sweet stuff in your life.


Obesity, Sugar and Heart Health

Over the last half century, obesity rates have skyrocketed. In 1962, 46 percent of adults in the U.S. were considered overweight or obese. By 2010, that figure had jumped to 75 percent.

Obesity is a complex problem with multiple causes. But among the likely suspects, sugar is high on the list. As sugar consumption has increased, so too has our national waistline.

If you’re concerned about protecting your health and your heart, you might want to take a closer look at the sweet stuff in your life.


Obesity, Sugar and Heart Health

Over the last half century, obesity rates have skyrocketed. In 1962, 46 percent of adults in the U.S. were considered overweight or obese. By 2010, that figure had jumped to 75 percent.

Obesity is a complex problem with multiple causes. But among the likely suspects, sugar is high on the list. As sugar consumption has increased, so too has our national waistline.

If you’re concerned about protecting your health and your heart, you might want to take a closer look at the sweet stuff in your life.


Obesity, Sugar and Heart Health

Over the last half century, obesity rates have skyrocketed. In 1962, 46 percent of adults in the U.S. were considered overweight or obese. By 2010, that figure had jumped to 75 percent.

Obesity is a complex problem with multiple causes. But among the likely suspects, sugar is high on the list. As sugar consumption has increased, so too has our national waistline.

If you’re concerned about protecting your health and your heart, you might want to take a closer look at the sweet stuff in your life.


Obesity, Sugar and Heart Health

Over the last half century, obesity rates have skyrocketed. In 1962, 46 percent of adults in the U.S. were considered overweight or obese. By 2010, that figure had jumped to 75 percent.

Obesity is a complex problem with multiple causes. But among the likely suspects, sugar is high on the list. As sugar consumption has increased, so too has our national waistline.

If you’re concerned about protecting your health and your heart, you might want to take a closer look at the sweet stuff in your life.


Obesity, Sugar and Heart Health

Over the last half century, obesity rates have skyrocketed. In 1962, 46 percent of adults in the U.S. were considered overweight or obese. By 2010, that figure had jumped to 75 percent.

Obesity is a complex problem with multiple causes. But among the likely suspects, sugar is high on the list. As sugar consumption has increased, so too has our national waistline.

If you’re concerned about protecting your health and your heart, you might want to take a closer look at the sweet stuff in your life.


Obesity, Sugar and Heart Health

Over the last half century, obesity rates have skyrocketed. In 1962, 46 percent of adults in the U.S. were considered overweight or obese. By 2010, that figure had jumped to 75 percent.

Obesity is a complex problem with multiple causes. But among the likely suspects, sugar is high on the list. As sugar consumption has increased, so too has our national waistline.

If you’re concerned about protecting your health and your heart, you might want to take a closer look at the sweet stuff in your life.


Obesity, Sugar and Heart Health

Over the last half century, obesity rates have skyrocketed. In 1962, 46 percent of adults in the U.S. were considered overweight or obese. By 2010, that figure had jumped to 75 percent.

Obesity is a complex problem with multiple causes. But among the likely suspects, sugar is high on the list. As sugar consumption has increased, so too has our national waistline.

If you’re concerned about protecting your health and your heart, you might want to take a closer look at the sweet stuff in your life.


Obesity, Sugar and Heart Health

Over the last half century, obesity rates have skyrocketed. In 1962, 46 percent of adults in the U.S. were considered overweight or obese. By 2010, that figure had jumped to 75 percent.

Obesity is a complex problem with multiple causes. But among the likely suspects, sugar is high on the list. As sugar consumption has increased, so too has our national waistline.

If you’re concerned about protecting your health and your heart, you might want to take a closer look at the sweet stuff in your life.